Making the Most out of High School

Male teacher explains concept for student seated at desk.

From the First Day to the Last
We’ve organized this page so that you may navigate through the entire realm of Academic Information from the beginning of the process (becoming a Cougar) to the end (graduating and taking your place in the world beyond high school). If you don’t see the information you need, please email the webmaster, and we’ll get it for you or direct you to the appropriate resources.

Enrollment Information

Seniors

Report Your Volunteer Hours

IMPORTANT NOTICE: WCS Board policy regarding graduation is non-negotiable! In order to participate in May’s graduation ceremony with your classmates, you must have earned all credits required for your diploma by the date of graduation. Seniors who haven’t earned all credits will be considered summer graduates and will participate in a countywide graduation ceremony in August. If you have credits to make up, contact your counselor immediately to schedule Credit Recovery or another means of earning the required credits for graduation.

Senior Year

Complete college applications.
Complete teacher recommendation packets and ask teachers/counselors.
When senior males turn 18, they must register with Selective Service. Visit their website to register.
August/prior

If you have college choices narrowed down at all, check their admissions requirements to see that you are registered for or have taken any entrance exams they require–ACT, SAT, SAT Subject Tests, ACT with writing.

September

All seniors should meet with their counselors.
Finalize your list of reasonable choices. Include at least one “long shot”, one “target”, and one “safe” school. Your first choice might very well be a school to which you are a likely candidate for admission. However, each one of you should include at least one safe choice on your list of colleges.
Once you have narrowed your list of colleges to a recommended maximum of six, you should begin applying. Most colleges prefer students to apply online.
Attend meetings with college representatives who visit CHS. Keep in mind that the representatives who visit us will more than likely be the ones to present your case to the admissions team at their college: MAKE A GOOD IMPRESSION!
Register for the September/October ACT or November SAT if you have not taken the test or want to retest. Obtain packets in Guidance or register online. (see our testing page for links)
Begin work on application essays. Most senior English classes include work on an essay.
Remember that the grades you make this semester will be an important ingredient in the way college admissions committees view your academic seriousness. Your first semester grades will be the last ones they see before deciding whether to admit you to their school.
Decide how you will actually apply: paper application, or applying online at the school’s website. Also, consider using the common application which will save you time. Just make sure your school accepts the common application.
Keep your commitment to take challenging courses! Your senior year matters!

October

Please do not push deadlines. It is to your advantage to file your application early. Most colleges admit that early applications automatically receive more attention because they demonstrate the student’s sincere interest in a school.
Early decision deadlines and scholarship deadlines may be as early as October 15. Do not allow a lack of planning on your part to create an emergency on our part. Submit your Transcript Requests two weeks before the deadline.
The college to which you are applying may require official copies of your test scores. Some schools require test scores submitted directly from ACT/SAT. Check the websites of the colleges to see what they require.
Attend Williamson County College Fair.
Notify your counselor if you would like to be nominated for a scholarship at the colleges you are applying.
Complete a Transcript Request form for each application you submit. Your transcript includes ACT and SAT scores, your grades and the school profile which explains the grading system.

November

Use your college visiting days well. CHS allows a maximum of 2 days which will be counted against your exemption but will be excused if pre-approved. Request the visit day with Student Services two weeks beforehand and bring a letter from the college for proof of your visit.
Teacher Recommendations – If the colleges to which you are applying require a recommendation from a teacher, choose and ask a teacher who you feel knows you the best and will represent you well. Give your teacher a copy of your senior data form. ALLOW AT LEAST 2 WEEKS TO COMPLETE A RECOMMENDATION FORM.
Provide an addressed and stamped envelope with the appropriate college forms and a copy of your senior data sheet attached.
This will be your last chance to sign up for and take the SAT or ACT in this year’s admission pool.

December

All college applications and transcript requests which need to be sent out before winter break are due in the Counseling Center two weeks before we leave for break. Applications that have a February 1 deadline should also be processed in December.
Transcript Requests submitted after the deadline will be sent out in late January. Please remember that Counselor Reports will be processed in the order they are received…not in the order of urgency for you.
Attend Financial Aid Night – usually the first Monday in December.
If you expect your counselor to write an effective recommendation for you, then allow sufficient time to process your recommendation.
Ace your mid-year exams—they matter!
Request Mid-Year transcripts to be mailed to the colleges to which you are applying.
Pick up financial aid forms in the Counseling Center. The FAFSA is the federal financial form, needed for both public and private schools, and the Profile is for private schools only. Remember, the lottery scholarships require the FAFSA!
Don’t ask to drop challenging courses. Colleges could withdraw their offer!

January

Complete and file your FAFSA as soon as possible. Aid is distributed on a first come, first served basis. Do this on FAFSA’s web site.

February

If you haven’t already done so, visit schools to which you applied.

Juniors

Junior Year

Begin the college selection process. Attend college fairs, financial aid seminars, general information sessions, etc., to learn as much as you can about the college application process. Make sure you are meeting NCAA requirements if you want to play Division I or II sports in college!

Register for the October PSAT. Pick up a registration form in the counseling office.
Save samples of your best work for your academic portfolio (all year).
Maintain your co-curricular record (all year).
Get serious about your schoolwork if you haven’t already; junior-year grades are extremely important as is the rigor of your coursework.
Attend college fairs and gather information.
Visit with college representatives during lunch.
Attend Williamson County Schools College Fair, Cool Springs Galleria.

October

Junior year, PSAT scores may qualify a student for the National Merit Scholarship Competition and the National Achievement and the National Hispanic Scholars programs. So, even though these scores will not be used for college admission, it is still a good idea to take the PSAT. The more times you take standardized tests, the more familiar you will become with the format and the types of questions asked. If you wish to receive free information from colleges, indicate on the PSAT test answer form that you want to participate in the Student Search.
Take SAT preparation courses, or study for the SAT and/or ACT.
Talk to your parents about limits – e.g., financial or geographic – they may set on where you attend college. It may affect your decision about where to apply.
Visit with college representatives during lunch.
Pick up an application to Governor’s school if interested.

November

Talk to your parents about how you will finance your college costs and how much they expect you to pay. Remember: a private school that seems more expensive on paper may actually be more affordable than a public school once you figure in financial aid, and you won’t know that until you get in.
Grades are used to determine scholarships and grants for which you may be eligible. So, put in the extra effort and keep those grades up!
If you will require financial aid, start researching your options for grants, scholarships, and work-study programs.

December

During December, you should receive the results of your PSAT. Read your score report and consult your school counselor to determine how you might improve on future tests.
Review your PSAT results with your counselor, and decide whether you’d benefit from a prep course or from using test-prep software. You can also improve your score by practicing on previously administered exams.
Consider attending Financial Aid Night. This program is really geared for seniors, but it’s never too early to start preparing to pay for college!

January

Begin to make a preliminary list of colleges you would like to investigate further. Surf the internet and use the college resources in the counseling office and school library.
Watch for open house events at colleges you would like to visit.
Identify the characteristics of a college that matter to you: size, geographical location, academic rigor, social environment, or diversity, to name some key examples.
If you hope to play a sport and may qualify for an athletic scholarship, contact coaches at colleges you’re considering.
If you plan to take the ACT, register now for the February ACT. Many colleges accept the ACT or the SAT I. Some colleges require the ACT or both SAT I and SAT II. When you being to explore different colleges and universities, double-check to see if they prefer or require the ACT, the SAT I, and /or the SAT II.

February

Meet with your school counselor to discuss your list of colleges. Discuss whether your initial list of colleges meets your needs and interests and whether you are considering colleges where you are likely to be admitted. You should be optimistic and realistic when applying to colleges.
Register for the March SAT I if you have completed the math courses covered on the SAT I. If not, plan to take the SAT I in May or June. Prepare for the tests by signing up for a prep course, using computer programs, or doing practice tests. But don’t spend so much time trying to improve scores that grades and co-curricular involvement suffer.

March

ALL juniors in Tennessee public schools will take the ACT on March 20. You do not need to register for this test, and it’s free.
Write, telephone, or email to request admission literature and financial aid information from the colleges on your list. There is no charge and no obligation to obtain general information about admission and financial aid.
Make a list of schools to visit during spring break (or in the summer or fall). If possible, it’s best to visit while schools are in session, so that you can visit classes and talk to students and professors. CHS allows a maximum of 1 day during the Junior Year which will be counted against your exemption but will be excused if pre-approved. Request the visit day with Student Services two weeks beforehand and bring a letter from the college for proof of your visit.
Visit college campuses and meet with admissions officers. Remember to call ahead for an appointment.
When selecting your senior courses, be sure to continue to challenge yourself academically. Select courses for your senior year that strengthen your academic record and ensure that you meet College Entrance Requirements.

April

Register for the May or June SAT or ACT if you want to apply early.
If wanting to take the SAT Subject tests, check the calendar carefully to determine when the subject tests you want are offered.
Continue to evaluate your list of colleges and universities. Eliminate colleges from the original list that no longer interest you and add others as appropriate.
Look into or apply for special summer academic or enrichment programs. Colleges love to see students using their knowledge and developing their skills and interests.
May

Take the Advanced Placement exam for any AP course you have completed. If you score well, you may receive college credits.
Find a summer job that will boost your skills – or your savings. But leave enough time to visit a few colleges.
Get a jump start on summer activities – consider enrolling in an academic course at a local college, applying for an internship, working, or volunteering. If you work, save part of your earnings for college.
Check your transcript at the end of the year to make sure it is correct.

Summer

Begin visiting colleges. Phone to set up an appointment. Seeing the college firsthand, taking a tour and talking to students can be the greatest help in deciding whether or not a school is right for you. Although, it is ideal to visit colleges during the academic year, going in the summer will be valuable. Admission offices employ their students to give tours and answer questions from prospective students and their parents.
Continue to refine your list of colleges and schools.
Take the SAT I or the SAT II.
Compile a resumé of activities, honors, leadership positions, and jobs. You’ll need this information for applications and scholarship forms.
If you have a clear “first choice” college, decide if you are going to apply for early decision or early action. Be aware that if you are accepted for early decision, you are likely committing yourself to attend that school.
If you are an athlete and plan on playing in college, contact the coaches at the schools to which you are applying and ask about intercollegiate and intramural sports programs and athletic scholarships.
Complete the NCAA Initial-Eligibility Clearinghouse form if you hope to play Division I or II sports. (This form cannot be mailed to you until you finish your 6th semester of high school – your junior year).
Start researching scholarships. Start thinking about your college essays and who you want to write your teacher recommendations.

Sophomores

Sophomore Year

Concentrate on academic preparation and continue to develop basic skills and co-curricular interests!

September
All sophomores will take the PLAN in October. The PLAN is a preliminary standardized test that will give you some preparation for the ACT. The PLAN does not have national testing dates. This year, we will register all sophomores for the PLAN during their study hall.
If you plan on taking the SAT later, consult your school counselor about taking the PSAT. The PSAT is a preliminary test that will prepare you for the SAT. If you want to take the PSAT, you will do so in October (this is optional). Then you will be required to take the PLAN on the make-up date.
Draw up a list of college majors that you think might intrigue you, and review your four-year course load with these majors in mind.

October
Take the PSAT and/or the PLAN for practice. The results will not be used for college admission.
Sign up, if you have not done so already, for co-curricular activities that interest you. The level of involvement and accomplishment is most important, not the number of activities!
Keep a record of your involvement, volunteer work, and employment (for the entire year).
If interested in either Governor’s School for more academic or arts enrichment, pick up a Governor’s school application in the Counseling Center.
College fairs can be a great way to “see” many schools at once. Try www.nacac.com, or talk to your counselor.
Attend Williamson County’s College Fair.

November
Make sure you are “on top” of your academic work. If necessary, meet with your teacher(s) for additional help.
Save your best work in academic courses and the arts for your academic portfolio.

December
Receive results of the PLAN and/or the PSAT. Read materials sent with your score report. Consult your school counselor to explore ways to improve on future standardized tests and courses to discuss which may be required or beneficial for your post-high school plans.

January
Look into National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) requirements if you think you may want to participate in sports in college. And consider whether your sports experience jibes with your college plans: Do schools that interest you field teams in your sport? Do you have a chance of playing on them?
Keep studying!
Volunteer – a great way to identify your interests and to develop skills

February
It is never too early to start researching colleges and universities. Visit the counseling office to browse through literature and guidebooks or surf the web and check out college and university home pages.
Teacher’s pet? You might want to keep it up. You will need teachers who know you well – and like you – to write your college recommendations.

March
NACAC has developed a list of online resources to help you in the college admissions process called web resources for the College-Bound. You can get the information online free on the NACAC website.
Decide if you want to take an SAT subject test. It’s often better to take the exam as soon as you’ve completed the relevant class, instead of waiting until later.
If you are interested in attending a selective college, register for AP, honors, and advanced courses for the 11th grade, if available.

April
Continue to research career options and consider possible college majors that will help you achieve your career goals.

May
Figured out you don’t need that summer school? Look around for other constructive ways to spend your time off. Find an interesting summer job, or try an academic or arts camp.
Consider taking a summer course or participating in a special program (e.g., enrichment programs, summer camps) at local colleges or state-wide colleges.
Consider working or volunteering.

Summer
If you work, save some of your earnings for college.
During summer, you may want to sign up for a PSAT/SAT or ACT prep course, use computer software, or do the practice tests in books designed to familiarize you with standardized tests.
Make your summer productive. Spend some time researching colleges. Can you begin to narrow down a list of some types of schools that are appealing to you? Urban or rural? Big or small? Public or private?

Freshmen
Freshman Year

It is never too early to start planning for the future!

Build a solid academic foundation:

  • Credits are awarded on a semester basis – .5 credit for each semester of a course passed. The “averaging policy” applies only to math courses, foreign language courses, chemistry, physics, and accounting. Work hard each semester!  If you begin your high school career with a low-grade point average, you will have to work extremely hard to raise it again prior to submitting college applications.
  • Build strong academic, language, mathematics and critical thinking skills by taking challenging courses.  Even if you don’t always make straight A’s, you will be better prepared for whatever you choose to do after graduation, and you will boost your academic credibility in the eyes of your admissions counselors.
  • Study hard and get excellent grades. Most colleges like to see at least a 3.0 GPA to meet their admissions criteria. In addition, to qualify for the Tennessee Lottery Scholarship you need at least a 3.0 on the state’s uniform grading scale. Start now!
  • Remember to buckle down early, since even your ninth-grade A’s (or D’s) will count in the eyes of most college admissions officials.  Additionally, most college admissions representatives are assigned to specific regions; therefore, your folder holder will probably be well-acquainted with the caliber of schools in your area and the courses they offer.  They know about your curriculum and may actually have read recommendation letters written by your counselors and teachers before.
  • Strengthen your vocabulary by increasing your reading.  Reading of all kinds, particularly nonfiction, can benefit you enormously.

Immerse yourself in all that CHS has to offer:

  • Attend athletic and artistic events–you may discover new interests, and you’ll broaden your cultural background while you’re developing lifelong friendships and having fun in the process!
  • Don’t be afraid to try new experiences. Check out our extracurricular offerings and select some clubs and organizations to try.  Attend a meeting or two and choose a couple of activities to cultivate.

Develop your interests:

  • Colleges want to see passion and commitment. If there is something that really excites you, explore it. Too often, students wait until the junior or senior year and then hurriedly – and unconvincingly – pad their resumés.
  • Take some time to think about why you want to go to college, which may have a huge bearing on where you should apply.
  • If you’re old enough to get a summer job, try it. You can get good experience and save money for college. Not old enough? Consider volunteering or enrolling in an educational summer camp. This could help you find your interests and start narrowing down some career choices.
  • Research careers and talk to your parents or other adults about your interests and goals. Find opportunities to meet people working in the professions that you think may interest you.

Make this year a solid foundation for the rest of your high school career:

  • Create a file for the following:
    1. copies of report cards
    2. a record of honors and awards
    3. a list of extracurricular activities, clubs or sports involvement at school, volunteer work, community service, and paid employment.
    4. By the time you are a senior or applying for a job, you can quickly put together a resume and not have to remember what you did three years prior–you can do this by setting up an account through www.collegefortn.org  to start an academic profile!
  • Use this information to begin creating your resume so that you don’t have to do all of this at once when preparing college applications.  You’ll be very glad you did!
  • Focus on your grades and your interests. If you learn how to handle school, extracurricular activities, and a social life now, you’ll be ready to apply to college senior year.

Plan ahead:

  • Foster a positive relationship with your counselor.  Visit the Counseling Center regularly and keep him/her posted about your achievements and activities.   You can get a lot of good advice as well as a much better letter of recommendation than a student who doesn’t know his or her counselor’s name.
  • Browse through college literature or surf the web to get an idea of what kinds of schools may be of interest to you.
  • Check out what high school courses colleges require.
  • Know NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) requirements if you want to play sports in college.
  • When ready to register for next years classes, challenge yourself academically. Slightly lower grades in challenging courses are better than higher grades in easy courses.
  • Choose electives carefully; ensure that they don’t replace the college-preparatory courses you need.
  • Be aware of your online presence–make smart choices when you are using social networks.
Rising 9th

Finish 8th Grade STRONG
• Remember that your 8th-grade assessments demonstrate your academic foundation (or the lack thereof).
• Take the spring assessments VERY seriously! Do your best so that we can see your true abilities.
• Remember that CHS curriculum teams carefully review all 8th-grade assessment data.
• Be prepared for more challenging work in high school. The structure, focus, and content of your work may change dramatically. –Increased demand for literacy –Grade level comprehension of complex texts –Citation of textual evidence when writing with purpose

The Cougar Summer Summit is a program designed to give incoming freshmen a valuable orientation about student life at CHS as well as a HUGE head start on academic excellence in the freshman year.
According to the Consortium on School Research at the University of Chicago, the freshman year is a “make it or break it” year for students. The largest factors in determining high school success are, by far, GRADES AND ATTENDANCE. Additionally, the freshman year is a major predictor of overall high school success.
Take a look at these statistics from the same research:
• More than 95 percent of students with a B average or better in their freshman year graduate.
• Freshmen who earn a B average or better have an 80-percent chance of finishing high school with at least a 3.0 GPA.
• Freshmen with less than a C average are more likely to drop out than graduate.
• Nearly 90 percent of freshmen who miss less than a week of school per semester graduate, regardless of their 8th-grade test scores.
• Freshmen who miss more than two weeks of school flunk, on average, at least two classes—no matter whether they arrive at high school with top test scores or below-average scores. In fact, freshmen who arrive with high test scores but miss two weeks of school per semester are more likely to fail a course than freshmen with low test scores who miss just one week.
The Cougar Summer Summit provides students with the following:
• Study/organizational skills
• Algebra Fundamentals
• High School Lab Experiences
• English I Essentials
• Experience in Using Technology in High School
• Lessons in Digital Citizenship
• Complete Preparation for the First Week of High School Academics
• Building Orientation
• Cougar Gear Drawings
• Daily Snacks
• Fun Competitions with Peers and Mentors
• Relationship Building with Fellow Students
• Relationship Building with Faculty and Older Student Mentors

Build a solid academic foundation:
• Credits are awarded on a semester basis – .5 credit for each semester of a course passed. The “averaging policy” applies only to math courses, foreign language courses, chemistry, physics, and accounting. Work hard each semester! If you begin your high school career with a low-grade point average, you will have to work extremely hard to raise it again prior to submitting college applications.
• Build strong academic, language, mathematics and critical thinking skills by registering for challenging courses. Even if you don’t always make straight A’s, you will be better prepared for whatever you choose to do after graduation, and you will boost your academic credibility in the eyes of your admissions counselors.
• This summer, strengthen your vocabulary by increasing your reading. Reading of all kinds, particularly nonfiction, can benefit you enormously. Take a book or Kindle to the pool or on vacation instead of just an iPod or your cell phone.

Yes, it’s CRUCIAL to succeed in the classroom, but your high school experience will be much more fulfilling and memorable if you develop connections and pursuits beyond the classroom. Here are some tips:
Immerse yourself in all that CHS has to offer:
• Visit the booths at Rising Freshman Night–you may discover new interests, and you’ll broaden your cultural background while you’re developing lifelong friendships and having fun in the process!
• Don’t be afraid to try new experiences. Check out our extracurricular offerings and select some clubs and organizations to try. Talk to the students manning the booths. Try to develop relationships early and look for those people when you arrive on campus in August.
• Not sure whether you will like something? GO to a meeting or event. TRY it out. You never know until you get involved.
Develop your interests:
• Colleges want to see passion and commitment. If there is something that really excites you, explore it. Too often, students wait until the junior or senior year and then hurriedly – and unconvincingly – pad their resumés.
• Take some time to think about why you want to go to college, which may have a huge bearing on where you should apply.
• If you’re old enough to get a summer job, try it. You can get good experience and save money for college. Not old enough? Consider volunteering or enrolling in an educational summer camp. This could help you find your interests and start narrowing down some career choices.
• Research careers and talk to your parents or other adults about your interests and goals. Find opportunities to meet people working in the professions that you think may interest you

It is never too early to start planning for the future beyond high school! Everything counts NOW!!!!!!! Your junior year is way too late to start thinking about these things.
Plan ahead:
• Pay attention to the name and face of your counselor. Once you arrive, visit the Counseling Center regularly and keep him/her posted about your achievements and activities. Work hard to foster a positive relationship with him/her. You can get a wealth of good advice as well as a much better letter of recommendation than a student who doesn’t know his or her counselor’s name.
• Browse through college literature or surf the web to get an idea of what kinds of schools may be of interest to you.
• Check out what high school courses colleges require.
• Know NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) requirements if you want to play sports in college.
• When ready to register for next years classes, challenge yourself academically. Slightly lower grades in challenging courses are better than higher grades in easy courses.
• Choose electives carefully; ensure that they don’t replace the college-preparatory courses you need.
• Be aware of your online presence–make smart choices when you are using social networks.
• Take ACT Preparation seriously from DAY ONE. It takes a long time and lots of steady, determined work to be successful. We have the program in place to support you. Pay attention to it and make the most of it. Your ACT score does not define you, but it DOES open the doors to where you want to go. It’s IMPORTANT!!!

Attendance

Williamson County Schools has amended the current absentee/truancy policy for the district. Students will have an allotted 4 excused absences for each semester. Students exceeding 18 absences for the year may be deemed chronically absent. Due to this policy, we are asking families to bring in a formal doctor’s note as often as it applies. Medically-excused absences will not count toward truancy; however, they do count toward Chronic Absenteeism. We are requiring that after 4 excused absences, that a formal note from a doctor should be obtained. It is our goal to work with families and ensure that students are given ample opportunity to succeed in the classroom.

Graduation Reqs.

Parents and students wishing to view more information about graduation requirements may review the current Williamson County School Board Policy.

Scheduling

Schedule change requests must be made no later than the first 4 school days of each semester.
VALID schedule change requests are considered before a semester begins and no later than the 4-day request for change period at the beginning of each semester. Students cannot drop a level because they changed their minds over the summer or did not do the summer reading or desire a different teacher.
Full-year courses may not be dropped at the end of the first semester. Exceptions to this policy can be made only by appealing to the Principal. If the exception is granted, the student will be required to take an equally challenging semester course.
CHS Schedule Change Requests

Student/Parent initiated schedule changes must be requested during the designated drop/add period prior to each semester or the drop/add form must be submitted to the counseling center no later than within the first four days of the new semester. Drops or adds after the deadline will be granted only in cases of extreme hardship and must be approved individually by the principal. Students will only be allowed to drop full-year courses at the semester with administrative approval and teacher recommendation. Students should consider class selection very carefully as teacher assignments are made based on those selections.

Schedule changes will be made for the following four reasons only:

The student already has credit for the course.
The student does not have the required preceding course.
The added course is needed for graduation of the current year.
The course was requested in writing during the scheduling time, but the course did not appear on the student’s schedule.
Problems with a Class

Students having problems in a course should follow the procedures below:

The student should make an appointment with the teacher to develop a plan to improve his/her grade and understanding of course material. The student should explore and attempt multiple options (Cougar Academy, after-school tutoring, remediation, etc.).
If the student follows the plan to the best of his/her ability and problems persist, the parent should schedule a parent/teacher conference.
If problems continue, the parent may request a meeting including the teacher, student, parent(s), counselor, and assistant principal. At this time, the team will develop a plan of action.

Registration

Registration Process: Selecting Courses

Centennial High School sets its number of sections and builds its master schedule based on student requests for courses. The initial registration early in the second semester determines the courses offered the following fall. Once the master schedule has been determined, students who requested and who were recommended for Honors and Advanced Placement courses will be obligated to take these courses. In other words, students will not be allowed to change their minds in the fall and drop down one level.

Registration Process: Rising 9th Grade
1. Centennial High School, along with the Parent Teacher Student Organization, will host an evening orientation session for the parents of rising 9th-grade students.
2. Centennial counselors meet at the middle school with 8th-grade students and their parents to register for next year’s classes.
3. Students will receive their schedules in August prior to the opening of school. Designated days are set aside for freshmen schedule changes. These changes do not include changes within the same level for the sake of changing a teacher or obtaining a more favorable daily schedule, or changing a schedule in order to have a class with one’s friends.
See “Scheduling: Change Requests.”

Registration Process: Rising 10th, 11th, & 12th Grades
1. Counselors will distribute relevant materials and talk to students about their courses and the new offerings in the school.
2. Counselors then meet individually with students to confirm biographical information and to complete their requests for courses for the next year. Four-year plans are revised if necessary.
3. On the Signing Day, students must obtain teacher signatures for classes requiring teacher recommendations. That night students must obtain parent signatures. After all required signatures are gathered, forms are returned to the homeroom teachers. Students who do not return registration forms may not receive their desired course requests.
4. Toward the end of the second semester, students who returned registration forms will receive confirmation of requested courses. At this time, students have their final opportunity to correct their schedules or to select different electives.
5. In early August, all students receive their schedules. At this time, only VALID schedule changes may be made. Valid changes include updating course selections based on summer school credits or correcting a scheduling error made by the school. INVALID changes include changing courses at the same level for the sake of getting a different teacher, changing courses for a more favorable schedule, or changing courses to have classes with one’s friends. Course requests generally must have a minimum of 12 students in order for a class to be created.

Dual Enroll.

CHS Dual Enrollment at Columbia State

Dual enrolling students planning to continue dual enrollment can register online through “Web for Students” by going to the Columbia State website and logging in to “Web for Students.” *Follow the links to register. *Course sections, times etc…. are available for review. *Note the location of the section(s) chosen. Students new to the dual enrollment program can access the new dual enrollment application from our website under “Admissions.” This page features a link explaining eligibility and a printable application. Students needing assistance should call the Dual Enrollment Coordinator.
Phone: (615)790-4409

Dual enrollment allows high school juniors and seniors to earn college credit while still in high school. College courses may also apply toward high school requirements if approved by the high school. Students may apply for Dual Enrollment at several institutions in the area, and you can look into surrounding colleges to find your preference. Many of our Dual Enrollment students attend Columbia State Community College.
To qualify for dual enrollment at Columbia State, a student must… *Have a 3.0 minimum high school GPA and a minimum ACT 19 Reading score or a minimum 900 composite on the SAT OR *Have a 3.2 minimum high school GPA, and the ACT or SAT requirement will be waived for one semester. An ACT 19 Reading score must be submitted in order to continue for a second semester. These requirements may be similar at other colleges, but please contact the college directly for exact information.
Applying for Dual Enrollment
Step 1- To apply to the college, qualified juniors and seniors must submit an online paper application for Dual Enrollment admissions. For Columbia State, applications are available online or at any of our five Columbia State campus locations. First-time students are required to submit a one-time $10 non-refundable fee with their application. Go to the Columbia State website to access the online application.
Step 2- Are you interested in financial assistance? The State of Tennessee provides dual enrollment grants for students who fully meet the college’s dual enrollment admissions criteria. The Tennessee Student Assistance Corporation oversees the grant program. The State grant pays up to $300 per semester, $600 per academic year. Students must maintain a 2.75 college GPA to retain eligibility each semester. To apply for the dual enrollment grant, the state requires you to complete an online application. Students must apply online for each semester at the TN state website under “College Pays” and “Dual Enrollment Grant Rules.”
Step 3- Have official high school transcripts and ACT or SAT scores sent to the Office of Admissions at the college. Please attach the counselor consent form to your transcript request.
Step 4- After the application and supporting documents have been processed, you will receive information about registering for classes. Please be sure to check with your counselor to ensure the class you’re registering for meets graduation requirements.
Step 5- Once you have registered at your college, bring a copy of your schedule to your counselor so we can adjust your schedule.

AP Courses

Centennial offers 23 Advanced Placement courses offered for the 2018-2019 school year.
Biology
Calculus A B
Calculus B C
Chemistry
Computer Science
English Language and Composition
English Literature and Composition
Environmental Science
European History
French Language
Human Geography
Macroeconomics
Music Theory
Physics 1
Physics 2
Psychology
Spanish Language
Statistics
Studio Art:  Drawing
Studio Art:  2D
Studio Art:  3D
U.S. Government/Politics
U.S. History
They are indicated on the transcript by the “A P” in the course title.

Gov.'s School

Tennessee Governor’s Schools provide 12 challenging and high-intensity programs for students currently in the tenth and eleventh grades. Students interested in participating in a Governor’s Schools program should obtain the application(s) from the school counselor. Nominations for the Tennessee Governor’s Schools must be made by high school counselors or principals. Applications for the 2018 Tennessee Governor’s Schools will be available on the state website in September of 2018.

See your counselor if you have additional questions about Governor’s School.

Grading

CHS Grading Scales and Policies
The Calculation of the grade point average is determined by dividing total grade points by total semester classes attempted. Credit given to all courses taken in high school is counted.

The Honor Roll is announced and published at the end of each quarter, and is based on a minimum of six for- credit courses and the resulting grade point average attained for all three honor roll levels as follows:

Honor Roll grade point average Principal’s List 4.0 +
High Honor Roll 3.75 – 3.99
Honor Roll 3.50 – 3.749

Grading Policies

For transfer students, the cumulative grade point average on the transcript for transferred work will be used. Recalculation will be made for honors and AP classes that were not given the same weight (less or more) as Williamson County students (.5 for Honors and 1.0 for AP). Recalculation will also be made if the grade point average was not calculated on a 4.0 scale. All students who are enrolled for the entire final semester of the senior year will be included in class ranking and honor recognition.

Semester and final exams are required for all students with the following exception. Seniors who have maintained a 91 average, have been absent no more than 6 days (including college visit days) during the semester and have not been suspended are exempt from exams for the qualifying class.

To audit means to take a class for no credit. Usually, a student audits the first-semester of a full-year course when in the previous year the student passed the first semester but failed the 2nd semester. This practice allows the student to be ready to take the 2nd semester for credit and be successful. The student is required to complete all work, including tests and the semester exam.

Home-schooled students must pass Centennial departmental exams in order to receive credit for each course taken at the high school level. It is the student’s responsibility to take these exams in a timely fashion. College courses taken for college credit, even when taken for dual high school/college credit, are recorded as Credit or No Credit with no grade point value.

Progress Reports will be provided to students mid-way through each nine-week grading period. Report Cards will be mailed at the end of each grading period. Incompletes- A student receiving notice that a course is incomplete must complete the required work and receive a grade within ten school days after the end of the grading period or the incomplete automatically remains the grade as reported in the notice. Only the principal may exempt a student from this policy.

The Transcript is a historical document of all courses taken at Centennial. Letters, not numbers, are used in reporting grades on the transcript. All grades, passing and failing, are permanently recorded on the transcript. When a course is failed and then repeated either in Credit Recovery or during the regular school year, the new grade does not replace the failed grade. The course and grade are added to the transcript and averaged into the cumulative Grade point average.

Averaging Policy: For certain sequential courses, the averaging policy allows students to pass even though they fail the first semester. This is possible only if the average of both semester grades is 70% or higher. Credit will not be given when the second-semester grade is the failing grade. Examples of sequential courses that fall into the averaging policy are Math, World Languages, Chemistry, Physics, and Accounting.

Credit Recovery: Students who have attempted and failed a semester in certain course(s) may be approved to earn credit through the credit recovery program. On the student’s transcript, “CR” will be listed by the course name to indicate the course was completed through Credit Recovery. A maximum of six (6) credits during high school may be earned through a credit recovery program.

The Williamson County Schools Credit Recovery policy offers sessions in summer. It is most often remedial, serving to aid the student who has failed a course. The credit recovery grade is included in the cumulative grade point average. It does not replace the failed grade. A maximum of six (6) credits may be earned throughout the high school career.

Lottery Scholarship

Lottery Scholarship Grading Scale

State law requires that students applying for lottery scholarships and other state scholarship funds be evaluated utilizing a uniform grading scale.  The uniform grading scale listed below is the state designated scale for that purpose.  Only this scale will be sent to the State for lottery scholarship purposes.  The Williamson County grading scale shall be used for all other official purposes including report cards, GPA, class rank, honor roll, etc.

A 93-100 B 85-92 C 75-84 D 70-74

Lottery Scholarship grading scale may include the addition of 3 points to the grades used to calculate the semester average for Honors and 5 points for Advanced Placement courses.

Exams and Exemptions

Excused absences will be granted during exam week only for surgery, death in the family or school-sponsored events, such as athletics or competitions. The parents must contact the school in a written notice detailing the nature of the emergency. The Principal may require a medical note. The Principal’s discretion will be used for outstanding circumstances. All other absences during the exam week will be unexcused.

  • No semester test will be administered before the approved date of the test.
  • Students skipping the semester or final exam will receive an incomplete on the test and an incomplete for the course until the exam is taken. Students may also face punitive consequences.
  • Semester and final exams, in a subject, shall not be required for those high school seniors who have maintained an A average in that subject, have been absent no more than 6 days during the semester, (not counting absences for college visitation days approved in advance by the principal or absences on semester and final exam days when the student is exempt), and have not been suspended during the semester. Unless mandated by the State of Tennessee, seniors who meet the criteria for exemption are not required to take the final exam. Teachers will report the number of exempt students for each course to their principal. Exemptions do not apply to Tennessee mandated end-of-course tests. If a student misses more than 20 minutes of a class period – they are considered absent and this would count as one of their 6 allotted days.
    • Any type of suspension (ISS or OSS) or an ALC placement would mean a loss of exam exemptions for seniors.
    • Absences due to school-approved activities (field trips, athletics, college visitation days approved in advance by the principal, etc.) do not count against the student.
    • Seniors who are exempt from their exams will also be exempt from their study period.
ACT and SAT

These are links to popular test prep materials.

www.act.actstudent.org   (ACT)

www.collegeboard.org  (PSAT)