Grade Level Information

Home/SCHOOL COUNSELING/Grade Level Information
Grade Level Information 2017-05-03T15:11:48+00:00

The registration process for the new school year begins in January. Nolensville High School sets its number of sections and builds its master schedule based on student requests for courses.  The registration in the spring determines the courses offered the following fall.  Once the master schedule has been determined, students will be obligated to take these courses.  In other words, students will not be allowed to change their minds in the fall.  Students should plan their schedules in a thoughtful, careful manner to match their abilities and their educational needs.

Registration for 9th Grade

Elective Focus Information

During the Spring semester, an orientation session for the parents of rising 9th grade students’ is held to provide parents an overview of the graduation requirements and the curriculum offerings.  Then, the NHS counselors meet at the middle school with 8th grade students and their parents to register for next year’s classes and to develop their Four Year Plan.

For rising 9th Graders – be sure to Mark Your Calendars!

Rising Sophomore Registration Information

Elective Focus Information

Counselors meet with students by grade level and hand out relevant materials and review courses and the new course offerings.  Students discuss these classes with their teachers and parents.

Students register by completing grade level registration forms.  Teachers recommend students for classes.

Counselors meet individually with students to review course requests for next year.  Four-year plans are revised if necessary.

In early August, all students receive their schedules.  At this time, only VALID schedule changes may be made. Valid changes include updating course selections based on summer school credits or correcting a scheduling error made by the school.  INVALID changes include changing courses in the same level for the sake of getting a different teacher, changing courses for a more favorable schedule, or changing courses to have classes with one’s friends.

Rising Junior Registration Information

Elective Focus Information

Counselors meet with students by grade level and hand out relevant materials and review courses and the new course offerings.  Students discuss these classes with their teachers and parents.

Students register by completing grade level registration forms.  Teachers recommend students for classes.

Counselors meet individually with students to review course requests for next year.  Four-year plans are revised if necessary.

In early August, all students receive their schedules.  At this time, only VALID schedule changes may be made. Valid changes include updating course selections based on summer school credits or correcting a scheduling error made by the school.  INVALID changes include changing courses in the same level for the sake of getting a different teacher, changing courses for a more favorable schedule, or changing courses to have classes with one’s friends.

Grade Level Information

There are important steps throughout high school that will help students achieve the most from these years that can have a tremendous impact on the future. Click on the licks below to learn more.

PLANNING LIST

For Parents of 8th, 9th, and 10th graders*

It may seem early to start thinking about getting your child ready for college, but it really isn’t–important groundwork should take place in eighth, ninth and tenth grades.  Here’s a list to help you make sure your child is on the right track:

  • Create a four-year high school plan.  Once your child is settled into ninth grade, introduce the idea of preparing an overall plan for high school that relates to his or her goals.
  • Make sure you and your child know what high school courses are required by colleges and that your child’s ninth-grade courses are on the right track.
  • Map out when these courses should be taken.
  • Familiarize yourself with the various levels of courses offered by your child’s school.
Freshman Handbook

Start your child thinking about careers.

  • Encourage your child to develop a tentative career goal.  Of course, it will change–often–but it’s the thought process that counts.
  • Help your child to identify interests–likes and dislikes–not just in academics but in all areas.  This will help your child focus on goals.
  • Encourage your child to discuss career options with others, such as the school counselor, teachers, recent college graduates who are working, professionals in the community, etc.

Suggest extracurricular activities. 

  • Encourage your child to actively take part in a sport, school club, music or drama group, or community volunteer activity.
  • Remember that colleges would rather see real involvement in one activity than a loose connection to several activities.
  • If you child may want to play sports in college, research the National College Athletic Association eligibility requirements.  the NCAA requires completion of certain core courses; you can find the specifics at www.ncaaclearinghouse.net .

Meet with the school counselor.  The school counselor knows how to help your child get the most out of high school.  Make sure your child has an opportunity during the school year to discuss post-high school plans with the school counselor.  You should participate in this meeting.

Save for college.  It’s still not too late to start a college savings plan, if you haven’t already.  Every little bit helps!  Investigate state financial aid programs and 529 plans.

Obtain a social security number for your child if you don’t already have one.  This is often required for applications, testing, scholarships, and other opportunities.

Meet with the school counselor–again.  Make sure your child meets with his or her school counselor to ensure that he or she is enrolled in college-preparatory courses.  Check to see that your child is taking an prerequisites to advanced-level junior- and senior-year courses.

Ask if the PSAT/NMSQT* is offered to tenth-graders.  While this test is usually taken in the eleventh grade, it is also often offered in the tenth.  That’s because it provides invaluable feedback on the Student Score Report; tenth-graders can then work on any disclosed academic weaknesses while there is still ample time to improve them.

Is your child interested in attending a U.S. military academy?  If so, he or she should request a pre-candidate questionnaire and complete it.

Attend college and career fairs.  These often take place in the fall, at your school, or in your area.

Support your child’s participation in a school activity or volunteer effort.

Extracurricular activities help students develop time-management skills and enrich the school experience.

Tour college campuses.  If possible, take advantage of vacation or other family travel opportunities to visit colleges and see what they’re like.  Even if there is no interest in attending the college you are visiting, it will help your child learn what to look for in a college.

*Information obtained from “College Counseling Sourcebook, 4th Edition © 2007 The College Board.

Juniors

College Planning Calendar for Juniors

Start with you:  Make lists of your abilities, social-cultural preferences, and personal qualities.  List things you may want to study and do in college.

Learn about colleges: look at their Web sites  – you can find links at www.collegeboard.com .  Talk to friends, family, teachers, and recent grads of your school now in college.  List college features that interest you.

Resource check:  Visit the counseling office and meet the counselors there.  Is there a college night for students and families?  When will college representatives visit your school?  Put the dates in your calendar.  Examine catalogs and guides.

At school, sign up early to take the PSAT/NMSQT*, which is given in October.  If you plan to ask for testing accommodations (because of a disability), be sure your eligibility is approved by the College Board.  Check with your school counselor.

Make a file to manage your college search, testing, and application data.

If appropriate (for example, if you’re interested in drama, music, art, sports, etc.), start to gather material for a portfolio.

With your family, start to learn about financial aid.  Read the Department of Education’s Funding Your Education* (about federal aid programs).  Use Getting Financial Aid published by the College Board and the financial aid calculator at www.collegeboard.com  to estimate how much aid you might receive.

Make a family appointment with your counselor to discuss ways to improve your college-preparation and selection processes.

Sign up to take the SAT* and/or ACT at least once in the spring and again next fall.  Register online or through your school.  Fee waivers are available for students with financial need.  To prepare, download practice booklets from www.collegeboard.com  (for the SAT) or from www.act.org  (for ACT).

Begin a search for financial aid sources.  National sources include the College Board Scholarship Handbook and electronic sources.  Don’t overlook local and state aid sources (as a counselor or check your public library).

Ask a counselor or teacher about taking the SAT Subject Tests™ in the spring.  You should take them while course material is still fresh in your mind.  You can download “Taking the SAT Subject Tests,™ which offers test-prep advice, from www.collegeboard.com.

If you’re in Advanced Placement Program*(AP*) classes, register for AP Exams, given in May.  You can earn college credit for courses not given in AP Program by taking CLEP* tests at a college test center.  See www.collegeboard.com to learn more.

Visit some local colleges–large, small, public, and private.  Get a feel for what works for you.  Attend college fairs, too.

Scan local newspapers to see which civic, cultural, and service organizations in your area award financial aid to graduating seniors.  Start a file.

Develop a list of 15 or 20 colleges that attract you.  Request viewbooks and information about financial aid and academic programs that interest you.  Visit some colleges over your spring break.

If you are considering military academies or ROTC scholarships, contact your counselor before leaving school for the summer.  If you want a four-year ROTC scholarship, you should begin the application process the summer before your senior year.

If you are an athlete planning to continue playing a sport in college, register with the NCAA Clearinghouse (www.ncaaclearinghouse.net).

Find a full-time or part-time job, or participate in a camp or summer college program.

Visit colleges.  Take campus tours and, at colleges you’re serious about, make appointments to have interviews with admission counselors.

Create a resume–a record of accomplishments, activities, and work experiences since you started high school.

Download applications (or request paper copies) from colleges to which you’ll apply.  Check application dates–large universities may have early dates or rolling admission.

*Information obtained from “College Counseling Sourcebook, 4th Edition © 2007 The College Board.

Senior Information

As your year begins, there are some important things you will need to know.  Please review the information below so that you will be able to work effectively with your counselor.

Conferences with your counselor will be held with all seniors to discuss the following points:

  • What is a college entrance exam?
  • What is my GPA and Class Rank?
  • What is included on my Transcript?
  • Who needs a Senior Data Form?
  • What type of Diploma will I earn?
  • How do I complete a college application?
  • How do I find out about Scholarships?

Your Counselor

Your school counselor will be assigned by the first letter of your last name.  Talk to your counselor about your post secondary plans!  As you discuss your interests, your goals, your reasons for going to college, your counselor can help make a decision about which college is right for you.

  • A-Z    Mary Kay Carter

 

 

Additional Information

Valid schedule corrections  to update course selections based on summer school credits or to correct a scheduling error made by the school take place the first 10 school days of each semester.  The beginning of the semester is not the time to revise schedules as a result of a student’s change of mind.  The master schedule has already been formed.

Students who requested and who were recommended for Honors and Advanced Placement courses in the spring will be obligated to take these courses in the fall. Students cannot drop a level because they changed their minds over the summer or did not do the summer reading or desire a different teacher.

Full-year courses may not be dropped at the end of the first semester, even if only an elective.  Exceptions to this policy can be made only by appealing to the Principal.  The usual consideration is whether the student has been academically misplaced.  If the exception is granted, the student will be required to take an equally challenging semester course.

If a parent wishes to override a recommendation made by the school pertaining to the student’s schedule, the student must remain in the class for the semester.  An override form can be obtained from the Counseling Center.

Override Form 2017-18

A student who is experiencing problems in a class will not be removed from the class outside the policies stated above. When problems develop, the following procedures should be followed:

  • The student should consult the teacher for ways to improve.
  • If the problem still exists, the parent should talk to the teacher.  Conversation can occur over the phone or through email, but the best communication is still person to person.
  • If the problem continues to exist, the parent can request a school meeting that includes the teacher, the student, the parent(s), the appropriate school counselor, and the grade-level assistant principal.  This team will form a plan of action.